Monday, June 11, 2012

Who cares if the National Organization for Marriage may have broken the law?

Brian Brown of NOM
The National Organization for Marriage hasn't said a word about being investigated by the state of California since the news broke last week.

But other folks are and they aren't exactly helpful:

A Republican leader says an openly homosexual presidential candidate is just being "a sore loser" in attempting to attack California's man-woman marriage battle.

California's Fair Political Practices Commission (FPPC) is investigating whether the National Organization for Marriage failed to report donations made to Proposition 8. Republican Fred Karger, whose website bills him as "the first openly gay presidential candidate from a major political party in American history," asked the Commission to look into whether the "Yes on 8" campaign failed to reveal almost $400,000 it received in 2008, including $10,000 from presidential candidate Mitt Romney's Alabama super PAC.

"Let's say for the sake of argument that Mitt Romney's super PAC contributed to Prop. 8. What's wrong with it?" asks Celeste Greig, president of the California Republican Assembly (CRA). "It was a valid proposition that the people overwhelmingly supported."

What was wrong with it was the fact that NOM may have not reported Romney's $10,000 contribution which came by the way of an Alabama PAC. And the fact that this money came from an Alabama PAC is odd in itself.

In addition, to the Romney money there were 10 more contributions NOM did not report, including: $150,000 from Michael Casey of Jamestown, RI, $100,000 from Sean Fiedler of New York, NY and $25,000 from NOM Board member Craig Cardon of Mesa, AZ, a General Authority in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

All in all, that's $340,000 which NOM is alleged to have not reported.

So it is a pretty big deal.

Attacking Karger is merely killing the messenger. If Greig was concerned about preserving the laws in her state, she would lay off of Karger and start asking questions about NOM.




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5 comments:

Marco said...

Considering the California GOP has been one of NOM best customers, they have a lot of spinning to do.

EvilI said...

"Let's say for the sake of argument that Mitt Romney's super PAC contributed to Prop. 8. What's wrong with it?" asks Celeste Greig, president of the California Republican Assembly (CRA). "It was a valid proposition that the people overwhelmingly supported."
In addition to the criminal failure to report...
Both of your two things are lies. It was not a valid proposition at all, what with the whole obviously being un-Constitutional thing. And it wasn't overwhelmingly supported, either--or, if you're going to call the support overwhelming than you're going to have to call the opposition overwhelming, too.

And then, even if there was nothing criminal, un-Constitutional, or untruthful going on there... we have a presidential candidate spending money for the whole purpose of harming American citizens--that is not a negligible point!

So that's what's wrong with it. At least four things.
Give me five minutes; I'm sure I can come up with more.

The Colorful One said...

That's the Religious Right for you. The gays are proof that our country is headed for the moral sewer. But organizations like NOM flouting the law is a-okay. To paraphrase Ron Weasley in the first Harry Potter book, "Their priorities are a bit messed up, aren't they?"

Erica Cook said...

apparently we're so vile that when it comes to stopping us from having rights anything goes.

truthspew said...

This Casey character in RI. I have to do a profile on him. From what I recall he made his money in a way very similar to how Romney made his.