Thursday, December 18, 2014

Bobby Jindal sidesteps controversy about rally by playing 'war on Christians' card

It is rather unbelievable the way Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal is attempting to defend his upcoming controversial prayer rally.

According to Religious Right Watch, he actually sidestepped questions about how his rally is being funded by the anti-gay hate group the American Family Association and instead pulled the "war against Christians" card:

 Jindal has now been forced to personally address the issue, which he has predictably done by side-stepping criticism of the AFA's bigotry and instead accusing "the left" of attacking Christians:

"Let's be clear about what this is. This is an opportunity for people across denominational lines to come together to pray," Jindal said. "It's not a political event, it's a religious event." He said that while he respects the rights of protesters, religious groups have the right to express their beliefs and should not be barred from being able to hold the event on the LSU campus. A protest is planned while the event is taking place at the campus's Pete Maravich Assembly Center, and critics are urging LSU not to allow the prayer rally to happen. "Christians have the right to rent, to pay for a hall at a public university so they can come together and pray," Jindal told reporters at an economic development announcement in New Orleans. Asked if he agreed with the American Family Association's agenda, Jindal sidestepped that question and said, "The left likes to try to divide and attack Christians."

Doing so is a huge mistake by Jindal because it not only sullies him but Christians in general. His defiance gives the impression that the following statements by the AFA's Bryan Fischer (who will be attending and broadcasting the rally) is an example of Christian behavior:

Fischer has a long history of vicious rhetoric and all of it has been documented via video and on print. If Jindal considers himself a true public servant (and especially a Christian), he should address why he is teaming up with such voices of unbridled ignorance and hatred like Fischer and the AFA instead of attacking those who are merely pointing out his hypocrisies.

On second thought, maybe he shouldn't have teamed up with Fischer and the AFA in the first place.

1 comment:

Erica Cook said...

I still think protesting is the wrong idea. I think that Christian groups should have a counter rally right next to them praying for peace. They want to say that religious liberties are being impeded, what they want to do is end religious liberties by making them the only recognized religion. I think it is no coincidence that their argument against gay rights is that they don't believe it is a choice. It is only a small step to say religion is a choice to so only religious freedom isn't necessary. If it is done right they will show their true colors in this.